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Booze & Madness

by Kirk Dubb

Released 2001
Released 2001
Booze and Madness proudly displays the drunken dexterity of Kirk Dubb, whose uniquely fermented spin on the rap game is a frothy brew consisting of equal parts Iceberg Slim, King Ad Rock, and Foster Brooks.
NOTES
Kirk Dubb "No Hope...Just Booze & Madness..."
What do you say about an artist like Kirk Dubb? He has the heart of a poet, the mind of a derelict, and he has just unleashed a debut CD that should impact hip-hop with all the sobriety and subtlety of a detox ward.

Booze and Madness proudly displays the drunken dexterity of Kirk Dubb, whose uniquely fermented spin on the rap game is a frothy brew consisting of equal parts Iceberg Slim, King Ad Rock, and Foster Brooks. Make no mistake. The science is as sloshed as it is sociopathic. It is also unapologetic, and undeniably REAL.

Kirk Dubb came up on old school rap legends like Kool G Rap and Digital Underground. But his flow comes as much from Bukowski as it does the Beasties. Sample lyrics: “I’d rather throw up than grow up”; “Pass me another and another like I’m Charles Bukowski’s brother”. When Kirk Dubb found his hip-hop religion, he found it floating in the bottom of a pint of Guinness. And he hasn’t strayed far since…

“I come from a proud lineage of drunkards and gamblers,” Kirk humbly explains.

When no less than Kid Rock heard one early Kirk Dubb track, “This Is It”, he offered to remix it on the spot, saying he would make the inebriated emcee an “underground icon.” Unfortunately for Kirk Dubb, the Kid also signed with Atlantic the same week, putting what was sure to be an intoxicating collaboration (and a record breaking bar tab) on permanent hold.

Enter legendary Northwest mixmaster Dynomite D (Dylan J. Frombach), whose turntable pyrotechnics have ignited tracks for the Beastie Boys, Money Mark, and Kid Koala. Dynomite’s wicked beats on tracks like “Party Time”, “Seldom Seen, Seldom Sober” and “In the Pocket” (where Dynomite makes the logical musical connection between Bill Cosby’s Fat Albert and the Fat Boys), proved the perfect antidote to the hangover of an M.I.A. Kid Rock. Dynomite D’s explosive tracks provide the proverbial missing olive to the shaken and stirred wordplay of Booze and Madness .

“This is hip hop music for the Everyman. The drunks and the degenerates. The Barstool B-Boys and all the Blue and White Collar Boozers and Boozettes. Dubb’s got the party market cornered,” as the man himself puts it. With Booze and Madness, Kirk Dubb can make a legitimate claim as hip-hop’s premier Wordsmith to the Wasted. “more hits than Timothy Leary.” Kirk Dubb’s got your next round when you do.